Video games helping docs to treat chronic pain; QR codes to be used for easy doc ID system in Oklahoma;

News From Around the Web

> A New York Times article published this week highlights efforts by some hospitals to use video games for treating chronic pain. According to Sarah Rebstock, a pediatric anesthesiologist at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., measures developed using data obtained via Microsoft's Kinect could help to reduce errors, and could be used to treat other conditions like autism, cancer and diabetes. Article

> QR codes soon will be added to all new and renewed medical licenses issued in Oklahoma as part of an effort to more easily verify the identification of physicians, according to a recent iMedicalApps.com post. The codes will link to a web page for the state's board of medical licensure and supervision that will contain information on all doctors such as education, specialty and board certifications. Post

Provider News

> Marilyn Tavenner was unanimously endorsed Wednesday by the Senate Finance Committee to head the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, which has been without a permanent administrator since 2006. The nomination of Tavenner, who has been acting administrator since late 2011, now moves to the full Senate for approval. Article

> Healthcare organizations will have to figure out how to overcome issues, such as a physician preference for autonomy, to successfully create and manage an accountable care organization, experts at the McGuireWoods law firm say in a paper. The paper outlines five key questions to consider when forming an ACO. Article

> Amid fears that physicians' performance data linked to compliance with the Affordable Care Act could be used against them in medical malpractice cases, the American Medical Association drafted model legislation that would keep ACA-related data out of court. As of press time, the state of Georgia was on the verge of enacting a law making the distinction and several other states are expected to follow suit. Article

Health Finance News

> State hospital associations are pushing hard to ensure Medicaid is expanded under the Affordable Care Act in as many parts of the country as possible. Lawmakers in states that oppose expanding Medicaid cite concerns that federal plans to financially support the expansion may not be long lived. As a result, as many as 17 million Americans who would be eligible under the Medicaid expansion may not be able to obtain coverage. Article

And Finally… Saying that "questions of reliability and robustness" remain is an understatement. Article

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