Utah telemedicine doc stripped of license; Ex-ONC No. 2 now an adviser to AHIMA;

News From Around the Web

> A Utah doctor who practices telemedicine from the island of Saipan in the western Pacific Ocean lost his license this month for not keeping in contact with his patients, Medscape Medical News reported. The doctor, Paul Gahlinger, according to the Utah Division of Occupational Professional Licensing, was labeled "a threat to public health, safety and welfare." Article

> David Muntz, former principal deputy national coordinator at the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT and current vice president and CIO at GetWellNetwork, has been named as the first adviser to the Board for the American Health Information Management Association. Announcement

> CVS Caremark and IBM today announced they will commit $1.5 million to the "Technology Solutions for Smarter Health" grant program in partnership with the National Association of Community Health Centers. The grants will support the use of innovative technology in community health centers to boost patient engagement. Announcement

Health Finance News

> The American Hospital Association (AHA) and other hospitals and health systems suing the federal government over adjudicating disputed Medicare claims in a timely manner have become more assertive in their lawsuit. The AHA and the other plaintiffs filed a motion for summary judgment--essentially a request for an immediate victory in their lawsuit--saying that under federal law it is the only way to obtain relief in the matter. Article

Provider News

> Hospital employment among doctors is gaining popularity. The number of hospital-employed primary care physicians increased from 10 percent to 20 percent from 2012 to 2014, while those who owned single-specialty private care dipped from 12 percent to 7 percent, according to a new survey from Jackson Healthcare. Post

And Finally... Repeat after me: The highway is not a race track. Article

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