Study: CPOE can be used broadly for medical imaging

Despite the complexity associated with computerized physician order entry, such systems can be used on a broad scale by medical facilities to schedule medical imaging exams, a new study focused on such efforts at Boston-based Brigham & Women's Hospital concluded. What's more, if properly used, CPOE can decrease inappropriate use of imagining while boosting the quality of patient care, according to the study's authors.

Published in this week's Journal of the American College of Radiology, the study examined the use of CPOE at the hospital from its initial implementation in 2000 through 2010. Of 4.1 million imaging studies performed over that time period, 94.6 percent originated from CPOE, the study's authors found.

Adoption was highest among dermatology specialists at 99.2 percent. Additionally, 99.2 percent of doctors in an emergency setting adopted CPOE. Cardiologists had the lowest adoption rate at 90.8 percent.

CPOE was most used for CT and MRI exams, the authors also noted. Success of the system was due primarily to "usability accessibility and reliability," they added.

"Our results suggest that with adequate IT integration and workflow optimization, we can engage providers in all care settings or specialties with CPOE for imaging ... to create an opportunity for [decision support] to improve quality, safety and reduce waste," the authors said.

Future implementation, the authors noted, is likely to be quicker and easier, considering that hospital employees today are more technology proficient.

To learn more:
- read the study's abstract
- check out this AuntMinnie.com article

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