Report: Prompt use of X-Ray, CT saved lives in Boston Marathon bombing; Cedars-Sinai files lawsuit against Lloyd's of London;

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> A report published in the journal Arthritis Care & Research says that the Boston Marathon bombings demonstrate that the prompt use of X-ray and CT scans was critical for assessing injuries to blast victims, HealthDay News reported. Doctors were able to save many people's lives and limbs by using imaging scans to quickly assess injuries, according to lead author Ali Guermazi, a professor of radiology at Boston University School of Medicine and one of the many specialists who treated bomb-blast victims at Boston Medical Center. Article

> Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles has filed an insurance coverage lawsuit against Certain Underwriters at Lloyd's London, alleging that Lloyd's wrongly failed to cover the hospital's legal costs for a class-action complaint filed concerning the faulty administration of CT brain perfusion scans in 2008 and 2009, Law360 reported. Cedars is claiming that the terms of its professional liability policies from Lloyd's provides that the hospital pay only a "single retention" or deductible of $3 million, while Lloyd's maintains that "each patient making a claim in the underlying action was subject to a separate $3 million retention up to a $15 million aggregate." Article

> Virtual Radiologic has filed a lawsuit claiming patent and copyright infringement and misappropriation of trade secrets against Tandem Radiology, as well as infringement of patent rights by Direct Radiology and Imaging Advantage through their use of Tandem's platform. The suit alleges that the defendants infringed upon patents related to automated teleradiology study assignment, automated order creation and teleradiology imaging processing. Announcement

Health Finance News

> Medicare reimburses physicians up to five times more for performing common procedures than for cognitive care, allowing specialists to generate more revenue in an hour or two than a primary care physician makes in a day, a new study published online in JAMA Internal Medicine finds. Article

Health IT News

> After three years building its infrastructure, Missouri Health Connection has rolled out the state's health information exchange. The exchange brings together more than 7,000 physicians, 62 hospitals and 350 clinics in the effort--representing more than 45 percent of the inpatient care provided in Missouri. Article

And Finally... Gnome homes multiplying in Kansas. Article

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