Rehab device improves motor skills after stroke; UCSF first to receive approval for Google Glass in OR;

News From Around the Web

> Using a novel device that converts an individual's thoughts to electrical impulses to move upper extremities, stroke patients reported improvements in their motor function and ability to perform activities of daily living, according to an announcement from the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). "Each year, nearly 800,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke in the United States, and 50 percent of those have some degree of upper extremity disability," said Vivek Prabhakaran, M.D., Ph.D., director of functional neuroimaging in radiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. "Rehabilitation sessions with our device allow patients to achieve an additional level of recovery and a higher quality of life." Announcement

> The University of California, San Francisco is the first to receive approval to use Google Glass in operating room from the Institutional Review Board, according to an article in the Sacramento Bee. Article

Medical Imaging News

> A new study in JAMA Neurology suggests that brain changes associated with Alzheimer's disease begin to occur as early as infancy. Researchers found that infants who carry the gene APOE-E4, which is a variant associates with an increased risk of Alzheimer's, have differences in brain development compared to infants without the gene. Article

Provider News

> Healthcare organizations are moving forward with plans for value-based payments and population health management for the upcoming year, according to the Governance Institute's 2013 biennial survey of governance structure and practices in the nation's non-profit hospitals and health systems. Article

And Finally... This is like The Hunger Games in real life. Article

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