Rad directors: No confidence in state of reimbursements

The latest numbers from the Medical Imaging Confidence Index (MICI) suggest that radiology managers continue to be concerned about reimbursement levels.

The index surveyed 178 radiology directors and hospital administrators from around the country. Respondents were asked to rate their level of optimism in five areas, with scores ranging from a low of 0 to a high of 200:

  • Monthly growth in diagnostic and interventional imaging
  • Adequacy of reimbursement from Medicare for diagnostic and interventional imaging
  • Internal operational and staff costs
  • Access to capital to IT and imaging equipment needs
  • Potential to grow as a profit center

MICI is produced by the market research firm the MarkeTech Group and the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA).

According to a story published on the AHRA website, the level of confidence in receiving adequate Medicare reimbursement for diagnostic and interventional radiology fell to 57 (very low confidence) in the first quarter of 2014, down from above 60 in the last quarter of 2013, and the lowest score ever recorded for the MICI survey.

Other survey areas showed varying levels of optimism and pessimism. For example, the level of optimism regarding growth in diagnostic and interventional imaging fell to 91.

Medical Imaging Confidence Index respondents in the fourth quarter of  2013 were particularly pessimistic regarding the purchase of new equipment in 2014, with Mark Renaudin, CEO and founder of MarkeTech saying that the level of confidence in having access to capital (75) was at the lowest point since the index was created.

Still, respondents were a little more optimistic in the first quarter of this year, with the mean score increasing to 79. They also were more optimistic about whether their sites will grow as profit centers.

The overall index composite score declined slightly to 91.

To learn more:
- read about the MICI report

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