PET/MR more sensitive than PET/CT for detecting prostate cancer; Radiologist diagnoses own blocked arteries testing CT scanner;

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> PET/MR has been shown to be more sensitive in detecting prostate cancer when compared with PET/CT, according to a study presented recently at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Annual Meeting, CancerNetwork.com reported. PET/MR now should be considered an alternative to PET/CT for restaging prostate metastases, the researchers said, particularly when small local tumor recurrences are involved. Article

> A radiologist who was testing out a new 640-slice CT scanner on himself may have saved his own life by doing so. James Naidich, M.D, of North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y. , became a patient when asked whether he would help test the hospital's new scanner, CBSNewYork reported. Little did he know that the scan would show that the three arteries to his heart were severely blocked. The blocked arteries have since been treated with coronary stents and Naidich credits the new scanner with saving his life. Article

> The use of CT scans to diagnose headaches in pediatric cases remains high, despite existing guidelines and the potential risks associated with radiation exposure, according to recent research published in Pediatrics. "Use of CT scans to diagnose pediatric headache remains high despite existing guidelines, low diagnostic yield, and high potential risk," wrote Andrea DeVries, Ph.D., from HealthCore Inc., Wilmington, Del., and colleagues, noting that less than 1 percent of pediatric brain abnormalities present with headache as the only symptom, Medscape Medical News reported. Article

Health IT News

> El Camino Hospital in California reduced readmissions by 25 percent through the use of predictive analytics and videoconferencing with nursing home staff who care for the most high-risk patients, according to a newly published case study by the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives. Article

Health Finance News

> The American Hospital Association is asking the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to reconsider its revisions regarding the admission of patients previously in observation care, and to begin financially penalizing recovery audit contractors for any errors they make in denying claims. Article

And Finally… One turtle, two heads. What more do you need to know? Article

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