Hospital employee faces criminal charges for HIPAA violations; Robotic-assistance helps control prostate cancer for 10 years;

News From Around the Web

> Federal prosecutors in Texas are pursuing criminal charges against a former hospital employee for alleged HIPAA violations. Joshua Hippler, 30, is being charged with wrongful disclosure of individual identifiable health information, with the intent to sell, transfer and use for personal gain. A jury trial for Hippler's case is slated to begin on Sept. 3, according to HealthInfoSecurity.com. Article

> The use of robots to assist in surgery to remove cancerous prostate glands has shown to be effective in keeping the disease under control for 10 years, according to a new study by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital. Study (.pdf)

> To combat incorrect use of inhalers, a new learning resource has been launched by the Australian minister for health, Peter Dutton. The online tool, developed by Asthma Australia and NPS MedicineWise, will help teach pharmacists, nurses and other health professionals how to engage with patients to help them better use the devices. Article

Provider News

> It will cost the country $17.6 billion over the next three years to hire enough doctors, nurses and nurse practitioners and build outpatient clinics to fix the widespread problems that led to the Veterans Affairs secret waitlist scandal, Acting Veterans Affairs Secretary Sloan D. Gibson told the U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans' Affairs. Article

EMR News

> Eighty-nine members of Congress have asked the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to give pathologists a break and extend the hardship exemption they currently enjoy for all of Stage 3 of the Meaningful Use program. Article

And Finally... It's raining cats, dogs and pingpong balls Article

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