EarlySense's Contact-Free Patient Monitoring System to be Featured at the First TEDMED Innovation Showcase, Hotel del Coro

Participants are invited to learn about how the EarlySense solution is helping medical teams to save lives and hospitals to save money

WALTHAM, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- EarlySense, a market leader in contact-free patient monitoring solutions, announced today that it will exhibit at the TEDMED Innovation Showcase, a new part of the TEDMED Conference (www.tedmed.com), October 25-28, 2011 at the Hotel del Coronado in San Diego, California.

EarlySense CEO Mr. Avner Halperin said, “Patient safety is a central issue today for patients, hospitals, government and the media. EarlySense’s system automatically and continuously monitors a patient’s vital signs and movement, using a contact-free sensor that is placed under the mattress. We look forward to demonstrating how the technology proactively detects patient deterioration, communicates it in real time and facilitates sophisticated care management. EarlySense is already making a difference in hospitals in the U.S. and Europe by helping medical teams to save lives and hospitals to save money.”

Experts agree that the EarlySense contract-free patient monitoring solution is making a positive impact. See some examples below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZNcZ3Tpav-s
Dr. David Bates cites an interesting case example of a documented save.
David Bates, M.D. is Chief Quality Officer and Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and the Executive Director of the Center of Patient Safety Research and Practice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SqFR2Wlcevg
Dr. David Bates discusses some key aspects of the EarlySense solution.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfT_-IFkYBo
Andrei Soran, CEO of MetroWest Medical Center, one of the hospitals in Massachusetts that has installed the EarlySense solution, shares a success story.

The system records and documents the cardiac, respiratory, and motion parameters for a full hospital unit. This information can be seamlessly communicated to the patient’s hospital record through the standards based EMR interface. The system alerts staff when significant changes in a patient’s clinical condition take place, as well as when a patient is at risk of falls or pressure ulcers. Nurses are informed of patient status changes, via a wired or wireless, communication system, on the patient’s bed side monitor, at the nurse’s station, on their handheld devices and on a large screen display mounted in a prominent spot on the wall in the department. Timely alerts of patient deterioration help make hospital Rapid Response Teams more effective. The EarlySense system is FDA approved, has a CE mark and is cleared for hospital and clinic use.

About EarlySense

EarlySense is bringing to market an innovative technology designed to advance proactive patient care to enable better patient outcomes. The company’s flagship product is an automatic, continuous, contact-free, patient monitoring solution that monitors and documents a patient’s vital signs and movement. There are no leads or cuffs to connect to the patient, who has complete freedom of movement and is not burdened by any irritating attachments. The system is currently installed at several medical centers in the United States and Europe and is now beginning sales in Canada. EarlySense Inc. is headquartered in Waltham, MA. For additional information, please visit www.earlysense.com.



CONTACT:

Press inquiries:
EarlySense Inc.
Marjie Hadad, media liaison
617-939-9514
[email protected]

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  California  Massachusetts  Middle East  Israel

INDUSTRY KEYWORDS:   Technology  Data Management  Hardware  Practice Management  Health  Hospitals  Medical Devices  Other Health  Medical Supplies  Nursing  General Health  Managed Care

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