Cornell researchers design smart clothing for health and safety; Why HealthCare.gov's code was pulled off the web;

News From Around the Web

> Scientists from Cornell University are using nanotechnology to make different types of smart clothing, including bike shirts with "motion-detecting turn signals, a jacket that heats and lights up with it's cold and dark and sensors that can monitor activity levels and fend off viruses and pollutants," CIO reported. Article

> Responding to a query from The Verge, officials from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services--the agency administering HealthCare.gov--told the media website that the site's code was pulled due to confusion over the difference between the two parts of the site. Originally made public, the code for the informational part of HealthCare.gov, or the "frontend" of the site, was written by a Washington, D.C., startup and a small team of innovative consultants. The code for the healthcare exchange, or the "backend" of HealthCare.gov, was built by more than 50 contractors and was never made public, the article reported. Article

Medical Imaging News

> Emergency department physicians believe that over utilization of CT exams is a problem in their departments and would welcome the introduction of clinical decision support as a tool to help prevent over utilization, according to research from the Washington University School of Medicine presented at last week's American College of Emergency Physicians Research Forum in Seattle. Article

Health Finance News

> A new study by the Kaiser Family Foundation indicates millions of Americans will fall into the so-called "Medicaid gap" wherein they earn too much to be eligible for Medicaid benefits in their state and too little to obtain subsidies on the health insurance exchange. Article

> Once considered one of the most reliable generators of jobs during lean economic times, hospitals may be entering into a hiring recession, USA Today reported. Healthcare providers cut more than 8,100 jobs last month, mostly from hospitals, according to the hiring firm Challenger, Gray and Christmas. Article

And Finally... The "Governator" on demand. Article

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