Case study: MI groups make P4P dollars through IT use

Increasingly, it's looking like smart use of IT is central to succeeding at pay-for-performance initiatives. Recent evidence for that proposition comes from the Ann Arbor (MI) Health Information Exchange, whose members have already begun raking in P4P bucks despite its being a relatively new organization.  Members of the group, known as the A3 HIE consortium, includes group practice Integrated Health Associates, along with specialty groups Michigan Heart, Huron Gastroenterology and Michigan Multispecialty Physicians, have used IT tools to make changes which have generated big payouts and major process improvements. Meanwhile, it costs less than $150,000 per year to run the HIE.

Integrated Health has taken in $1.2 million since June 2006 through Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Michigan's P4P program. IHA attributes its success, in large part, to its data sharing initiative, under which 250-odd physicians and 50 nurse practitioners share patient data through a Web portal. The portal allows physicians to share registration and intake data, shaving significant time off of interviews, while focusing on key preventive measures like vision screening for diabetics. Meanwhile, the other three groups have collected $350,000 since 2005 through the Southeast Michigan e-Prescribing Initiative, an e-prescribing effort backed by General Motors, Ford Motor and Chrysler.

To find out more about the A3 HIE:
- read this Modern Healthcare piece

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