Brain imaging study of combat veterans finds evidence of brain damage years after trauma; Molecular imaging device market to hit $3 billion by 2018;

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> A brain imaging study at St. Louis University has found that veterans who suffer head-related blast injuries have changes in their brain tissue that remain evident in brain scans years after the event, KMOX reported. "[W]hat we can say is there are some evident differences in the brain structure in these individuals which may account for some of the difficulties that they're having," neuropsychologist Tyler Roskos told KMOX. Article

> The global molecular imaging device market is expected to hit $2.2 billion in 2013 and $3 billion by 2018, according to a report by BCC Research. An aging global population, advances in nanotechnology and robotics, as well as increasing demand for more accurate and efficient imaging systems will drive steady growth in this market over the next five years, the report finds. Announcement

> Sonographers are capable of providing interpretations of abdominal ultrasound studies when radiologists are unable to provide reads in a timely fashion, according to a study in the journal Radiography. Researchers led by Michal Schneider, Ph.D., of Monash University in Victoria, Australia, analyzed 85 emergency abdominal ultrasounds and found that sonographers' findings had total agreement with radiologists' reports in 85 percent of cases, AuntMinnie.com reported. Article

Health IT News

> Computerizing prescription order entry and medication reconciliation doesn't necessarily improve those processes as much as we'd like to think, according to two presentations given at the midyear meeting of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Article

Health Finance News

> The declining cost increases in healthcare delivery has apparently had a collateral effect on repealing the sustainable growth rate formula as the Congressional Budget Office has reduced the price tag of eliminating the unpopular method for gauging physician payments by tens of billions of dollars. Article

And Finally... Free tacos or else. Article

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