AMA health IT platform available nationwide

Amagine, Inc., a subsidiary of the American Medical Association, has announced the nationwide availability of its health IT solutions platform with the same name. That platform offers physicians more than 20 different products, ranging from e-prescribing software to electronic health records and consulting resources. Amagine will provide consultants to help physicians assess their readiness for the digital plunge and choose the best products for their practices.

Judging by the pricing mentioned in the announcement, AMAGINE has the potential to shake up the EHR market. Web-based EHRs from NextGen, UnitedHealth Group subsidiary Ingenix, and MedPlus--part of Quest Diagnostics--will all be available for $300 per physician, per month or less, according to the release. That's substantially less than the cost of most fully functional, cloud-based EHRs.

At the other end of the scale, AMAGINE will supply e-prescribing solutions from DrFirst, MedPlus Care 360, and Allscripts at prices starting from $20 per doctor per month--a reasonable charge for an e-prescriber that comes with a Surescripts connection and other services.

Patient registries from WellCentive, DocSite and DrFirst also are included in the offering. There are other solutions for lab ordering and reporting, revenue cycle management, and clinical decision support.

In collaboration with the Michigan State Medical Society, the AMA has been field-testing the Amagine platform in that state since 2009. Last month, the AMA announced that Amagine had teamed up with Covisint, a technology company, and my1HIE, a health information exchange operated by several IPAs, to offer Michigan physicians the same menu that's now being served up nationwide. 

To learn more:
- read the Amagine press release 

Suggested Articles

Nearly 10,000 patients involved in research studies were impacted by a third-party privacy breach that may have exposed their medical diagnoses.

Veterans Health Administration medical facilities currently have a paper medical record backlog that if stacked up would be 5.15 miles high, according to the…

The Department of Health and Human Services announced proposed changes to privacy restrictions on patients' substance use treatment records.