West Penn Allegheny will cut 400 jobs, not 1,500

West Penn Allegheny has revised its estimated job cuts to 400 from 1,500.

This past June, West Penn Allegheny Health System, based in Pittsburgh, estimated that up to 1,500 staff members would be let go by January 2011 due to consolidation of two city-based acute-care hospitals and cuts in inpatient and emergency services at another hospital.

But a mix of jobs openings in other parts of the West Penn system and the resignation of 220 employees means fewer jobs will be cut. "We have done everything possible to minimize the number of people who will lose jobs as a result of our changes," Christopher T. Olivia, MD, WPAHS president and CEO, said in a press release.

So far the following shifts have occurred or are in the works:

  • 210 employees whose positions were cut have accepted other open positions within the system.
  • 65 employees' jobs will move from West Penn Hospital to Allegheny General Hospital as clinical services are moved.
  • 220 employees resigned from their jobs at West Penn Allegheny. Among those who resigned was Dawn Gideon, the executive vice president and chief of hospital operations, according to the Post-Gazette.
  • 400 employees across the system will lose their jobs and receive severance packages.

Under the consolidation, Allegheny General Hospital will serve as West Penn Allegheny's quaternary care facility, supporting the system's comprehensive services in oncology, neurosciences, critical care, orthopedics and cardiovascular care.

The system is also in the middle of a $60 million renovation to build 96 private patient rooms for Allegheny General. Plans also are afoot to open an outpatient care center in 2011.

To learn more:
- read the West Penn press release
- here's the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette story

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