VA Physician Wins Prestigious Cardiac Award

WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Dr. Robert Jesse, principal deputy under secretary for health for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), has been honored by a leading professional association for his work to improve emergency cardiac care.

“We are proud to see Dr. Jesse recognized for his service and honored that he continues a long legacy of VA physicians standing at the forefront of modern health care,” said VA Under Secretary for Health Dr. Robert Petzel. “I can think of no one who deserves this award more than Dr. Jesse.”

The award was presented by the Society of Chest Pain Centers, best known as a grassroots effort to bring emergency physicians together to improve early cardiac care. Raymond D. Bahr Award of Excellence is given to individuals who demonstrate extraordinary excellence, vision, and leadership in advancing healthcare. The group said Jesse’s work in developing an innovative risk-based triage protocol for patients has contributed significantly to the field of cardiac medicine.

“I am delighted to receive this award,” Jesse said. “To be recognized for contributing to improving cardiac care is truly humbling, and I am honored to be counted among other outstanding Bahr Award recipients.”

Jesse was honored at an award ceremony on May 4 at the 14th Congress of Chest Pain Centers in Miami. The award was presented by the officers of the executive committee of the society.



CONTACT:

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
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202-461-7600

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  District of Columbia

INDUSTRY KEYWORDS:   Health  Cardiology  Hospitals  Public Policy/Government  Other Policy Issues  Public Policy  Managed Care

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