Survey: Nurses don't trust their employers

Talk about a vote of no confidence: A new study concludes that many nurses wouldn't be comfortable having friends or family receive care where they work. According to the study, conducted by the American Nurses Association on its website, 49.5 percent of the 15,000 nurses wouldn't feel confident about having someone they care about get treatment at their hospital or clinic.

Why are they concerned? Staffing levels, primarily; about 72 percent said that they don't feel their employers have put sufficient staffing in place, and more than half said that quality of care on their units had fallen over the past year. Meanwhile, 53 percent of respondents are thinking about leaving their jobs over this issue.

The release of this study--which was focused on staffing levels, job satisfaction and perceptions of care quality--is part of a larger effort by the ANA, which is supporting federal legislation requiring that providers develop nurse staffing plans in consultation with their nurses. Three bills along these lines have already been introduced in Congress.

To learn more about this study:
- read this Modern Healthcare piece (reg. req.)

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