Study: Medicare quality perceptions similar despite spending

Despite regional variations in spending, Medicare beneficiaries perceived themselves as receiving a similar quality of care, according to a new study. Researchers looking at per capita Medicare spending and patient perceptions of care quality across 10 measures found no consistent correlation, according to results in an upcoming article to be published in the Journal of the American Medical Association

In the study, Medicare regions were divided into five parts, with highest spending being $8,522 per capita and lowest being $5,209 per capita. Patients in regions with lower spending didn't think their needs for specialty providers or tests were unmet, researchers said. Meanwhile, while patients in higher-cost regions get more specialty care, see more doctors and spend more time in hospitals, they don't seem to survive longer or get more access to care.

To learn more about the study:
- read this Modern Healthcare piece (reg. req.)

Related Articles:
CMS tightening quality-reporting measures
Feds consider restructuring Medicare quality program

Suggested Articles

The profit margins and management of Community Health Group raise questions about oversight of managed care insurers.

Financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting medical credit cards to their patients.

A proposed rule issued by HHS on Tuesday would expand short-term coverage, a move Seema Verma said will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums.