Study: Hospital infections, related costs rise

Hospital infection rates are on the rise--and the price tag for treating them is, too, according to a new study drawing on data from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

The study, published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, found that the rate of Staphylococcus aureus infections grew more than 7 percent each year from 1998 to 2003. Meanwhile costs related to the infections grew a staggering 12 percent each year studied. The money invested seems to have done some good, however, as Staph-related in-hospital mortality rates dropped 5 percent each year during the same period. 

So what's behind these numbers? Researchers speculate that while detection programs have improved, and treatment of infections as well, MRSA controls still aren't adequate.

To find out more about the study:
- read this Modern Healthcare piece

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