Study: Hospital cleanliness, renovations matter

A new study by the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) found two concerns--infection control and building improvements--seem to be foremost in its members' minds. 

The ACHE, which received survey responses from 511 chief executive officers, found 91 percent believe investment in better buildings fosters better patient care, and 88 percent feel building improvements boost staff morale. More than half said they'd done $1 million or more worth of renovations to their hospitals over the last three years. These renovations sometimes included adding natural light, employee exercise rooms or staff-only cafeterias.

The study also concluded execs are paying close attention to infection control measures, with widespread use of methods such as installing hand-hygiene stations, setting up separate "clean" and "dirty" areas on patient floors and housing patients in single-occupancy rooms.

To get more information from the study:
- read this Modern Healthcare piece (reg. req.)

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