State court rejects HIPAA; Trinity security breach exposes patient information;

> A Michigan state appellate court ruled that state laws trump HIPAA patient privacy laws, reversing a trial court's decision in which a podiatrist previously did not have to disclose his patients' names during proceedings, reports American Medical News. Legal experts raise concerns that the Michigan ruling may affect patient privacy and physician peer review in other states. Article 

> Trinity Medical Center in Birmingham, Ala., posted a notice and apology for a major security breach of patients' surgery schedules, which included names, birthdays, social security numbers and medical information. Trinity and the U.S. Postal Inspector recovered all stolen information, and the hospital vows to increase security measures, particularly at the registration area. Press Release

> Emergency department physicians grow frustrated and feel burned out from frequent fliers, patients who visit the ED 10 or more times a year because of lack of primary care, homelessness, substance abuse or other reasons, according to a Henry Ford Hospital survey released on Friday. Researchers say the findings are a "wake-up call for hospital administrators to look at ways to manage these types of patients." Survey

> Northeast Health, St. Peter's Health Care Services and Seton Health, all in New York State, merged to create St. Peter's Health Partners, they announced last week. The governing boards approved the name and branding last month, and the merger will finalize this summer. Press Release (.pdf)

> Person Memorial Hospital in Person County, N.C., announced it will merge with Duke Lifepoint Healthcare, which is a joint organization of Duke University Health System and LifePoint Hospitals. Person signed a memorandum, which is a nonbinding agreement. Press Release

And Finally... Pot supermarket opens. Article

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