Stanford Hospital & Clinics Ranked One of America’s Best Hospitals by U.S. News & World Report

Stanford Hospital & Clinics Ranked One of America’s Best Hospitals by U.S. News & World Report

<0> Stanford Hospital & ClinicsJames Larkin, 650-736-9459 </0>

Stanford Hospital & Clinics, an academic medical institution of the Stanford School of Medicine, has been ranked one of the best hospitals for 2013-14 by in 13 out of 16 medical specialties, including a top ten ranking in cancer and ear, nose & throat. The magazine also ranked Stanford one of the top two hospitals in the state of California and the best in the metro area. The hospital earned national rankings in three additional specialties over last year.

“We’re pleased to see that the outstanding patient care delivered by our leading physicians helped us once again achieve national recognition in nearly all of the specialties ranked by this year,” said Amir Dan Rubin, president and CEO, Stanford Hospital & Clinics. “Patients who choose Stanford Hospital & Clinics benefit from the most advanced multi-disciplinary care available, delivered with unparalleled coordination and compassion. At Stanford Medicine, we are continually driving innovations that become the new standards for patient care.”

The annual rankings, now in their 24th year, recognize hospitals that excel in treating patients with the most challenging conditions. The magazine evaluates hospitals in 16 adult specialties, ranking the nation’s top 50 hospitals and recognizing other high-performing institutions. Stanford was ranked among the nation’s very best hospitals in: cancer; cardiology/heart surgery; ear, nose & throat; gastroenterology; geriatrics; gynecology; nephrology; neurology/neurosurgery; orthopaedics; psychiatry; pulmonology; rheumatology; and urology.

“Though we all know that external rankings offer just one perspective, today's news provides me with an opportunity to express my deep appreciation to Stanford Medicine faculty and trainees for the work they do every day to bring exceptional care to our patients,” said Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine. “It is a privilege to work with such a wonderful partner as CEO Amir Rubin in the shared mission of Stanford Medicine. In the months and years ahead, we will continue moving forward, firmly focused on our vision of transforming patient care.”

publishes Best Hospitals to help guide patients who need a high level of care because they face particularly difficult surgery, a challenging condition, or added risk because of other health problems or age. According to the magazine, measures such as patient survival and safety data, the adequacy of nurse staffing levels and other data largely determined the rankings in most specialties.

“A hospital that emerges from our analysis as one of the best has much to be proud of,” said Avery Comarow, health rankings editor. “Just three percent of all hospitals earn a national ranking in any specialty.”

The rankings have been published at and will appear in print in the U.S. News guidebook, available in bookstores and on newsstands August 27.

Stanford Hospital & Clinics, located in Palo Alto, California with multiple facilities throughout the region, is internationally renowned for leading edge and coordinated care in cancer, neurosciences, cardiovascular medicine, surgery, organ transplant, medicine specialties and primary care. Stanford Hospital is an academic medical institution of Stanford University School of Medicine. Throughout its history, Stanford has been at the forefront of discovery and innovation, as researchers and clinicians work together to improve health, alleviate suffering, and translate medical breakthroughs into better ways to deliver patient care. Stanford Hospital & Clinics: Healing humanity through science and compassion, one patient at a time. For more information, visit:

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