Pertussis Expert at Packard Children’s Hospital Available for Media Interviews

CDC reports major spike of cases in the U.S.

Pertussis Expert at Packard Children’s Hospital Available for Media Interviews

<0> Lucile Packard Children’s HospitalRobert Dicks, 650-497-8364 </0>

The has reported that the U.S. is on track to have a worst-in-six-decades year for pertussis, or whooping cough, with more than 18,000 cases reported so far in 2012.

Physician-researcher , chief of pediatric infectious disease at Packard Children’s and professor at the Stanford School of Medicine, is available to media for interviews and expert comment about this highly contagious respiratory disease. Dr. Maldonado can discuss with reporters:

* The importance of immunization and booster shots

* Warning signs, and the danger to babies

* Recommendations for pregnant moms

* Why California has few whooping cough cases in spite of the nationwide epidemic

* Travel tips

Dr. Maldonado is internationally known for her research on infectious diseases that affect children, including measles, polio and HIV. In addition to Dr. Maldonado’s commentary, the California Department of Public Health offers a pertussis resource page for the public at .

is an internationally recognized, 311-bed hospital, research center and leading regional medical network providing the full complement of services for the health of children and expectant mothers. In partnership with the Stanford University School of Medicine, our world-class doctors and nurses deliver innovative, family-centered care in every pediatric and obstetric specialty, tailored to every patient. Packard Children’s is annually ranked as one of the nation’s best pediatric hospitals by and is the only Northern California children’s hospital with specialty programs ranked in the Top 10. Learn more about us at and about our continuing growth at . Friend us on , watch us on and follow us on .

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