Paralyzed Veterans of America Calls for Senate Action on Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities Treaty

Paralyzed Veterans of America Calls for Senate Action on Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities Treaty

<0> Paralyzed Veterans of AmericaLani Poblete, 202-416-7667 </0>

 (Paralyzed Veterans) is calling for Senate action on the  (CRPD) Treaty following the Supreme Court ruling in Bond v. United States.

Paralyzed Veterans’ National President  said:“Paralyzed Veterans has long championed the rights and freedoms of people with disabilities, particularly those men and women who honorably served this nation. Ratification of this treaty would help to expand accessibility across the world and maximize independence for millions of people with disabilities. We urge the Senate to move forward immediately with ratification of the CRPD.”

The unanimous judgment in the  case supports what disability advocates and legal scholars had long contended: that the Bond case is irrelevant to the process of ratifying the CRPD Treaty, a treaty designed to promote the human rights of people with disabilities. The Bond case involved a challenge to a federal statute implementing the Chemical Weapons Convention, which was enacted after the CRPD was negotiated.

Lawson further stated: “Ratification of the treaty would reaffirm the United States’ commitment to international , and allow the nation to lead the effort to ensure that any person with a disability is able to live, work, learn and travel around the world without barriers to access.”

Paralyzed Veterans of America was founded by a group of seriously injured American heroes from the “Greatest Generation” of World War II. They created a nonprofit organization to meet the challenges that they faced back in the 1940s—from a medical community not ready to treat them to an inaccessible world. For more than 68 years, Paralyzed Veterans’ national office and its 34 chapters across the nation have been making America a better place for all veterans and people with disabilities. ()

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