Offer physicians research time to boost job satisfaction

With a looming physician shortage, hospitals have been trying all sorts of ways to keep their employees happy and ultimately keep them at their facility. According to new research from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), it's not only salary and benefits that make physicians happy.

VA physicians who spend part of their time (at least 20 percent) doing research are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs, according to an article published in Academic Medicine. Physicians involved with research activities also reported more favorable job characteristics.

"Research and continuous learning are vital to improving the health and health care of veterans," Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki said in a statement. "As this study shows, the outcome is not only in terms of scientific innovation and development on behalf of veterans, but also in terms of the professional fulfillment our physicians' experience."

Although the study analyzed physicians at 135 VA medical centers, the findings suggest potential benefits of offering physician research opportunities in other healthcare settings.

The article notes that providing opportunities for physicians to conduct research will require time and cost. However medical centers that offer research activities may have a more satisfied workforce, which could positively influence the quality of care.

For more:
- read the VA press release
- here's the article

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