New medical journal promotes study of patient-provider collaboration

As the phenomenon  dubbed "health 2.0" has rolled along, gradually embracing many forms of healthcare practice, one trend that has become more visible is the notion of "participatory medicine," in which newly-empowered patients engage in shared decision making with their providers.

This week at the Connected Health Symposium in Boston, some leading thinkers in the movement will launch a formal academic publication designed to support the practice of this form of medicine. The Journal of Participatory Medicine will be a peer-reviewed journal published exclusively online. The content will be published using Open Journal Systems, an open-source technology journal management and publishing system, and content will be available at no charge.

The Journal, which is now accepting submissions, is being published by the Society for Participatory Medicine. The Society's goals include advancing the understanding of doctors and other professionals in the importance of well-informed, empowered and engaged patients in making decisions about their care and treatment, and to foster communication among medical, communication, patient advocacy and public health sub-specialties regarding participatory medicine.

To learn more about the Society and Journal:
- read the Journal's introductory page
- read the Society's white paper (.pdf)

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