Miami’s Oncology Referral Network Assists Nearly 200 Patients in 2010

Company Offers Concierge Medicine for Complex Cases at No Cost to Patients

MIAMI--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Since March of last year, Oncology Referral Network of America, a healthcare service provider which pairs international patients with a network of physicians and medical centers in South Florida, has assisted 192 patients. Serving primarily oncology, orthopedic, cardiology and high-end diagnostic cases, patients have been directed to appropriate inpatient care as well as to premier hospitals such as Jackson Memorial, Baptist, Broward General, Kendall Regional, Aventura, Cleveland Clinic, Miami Children’s Hospital, and the University of Miami Bascom Palmer.

ORNOA, which does not charge its patients a fee, was started last year by two experienced healthcare administrators who saw a need to help patients coming to South Florida for medical care not found in their countries. “Concierge medicine” has been around for a long time and traditionally extends its services to high-end patients with good insurance or who have the ability to pay for expensive procedures in the United States. Typically the patient pays a hefty fee for having this level of service. ORNOA, a non-hospital based patient navigation service, refers cases to its network of physicians and medical centers in South Florida, but is not exclusively limited to any one physician or medical center.

“Remaining independent is important to our business model, as this gives us the liberty to make the best recommendations to our patients,” said ORNOA Managing Partner, Maria Freed. “Our revenues come from monthly fees collected from network physicians and insurance companies who see the value in offering patients personalized guidance when they come to the United States.”

These fees are not set by the level of patient volume, or the savings made from discounted pricing. ORNOA is not a patient brokering firm and does not interfere with existing insurance arrangements.

ORNOA recently assisted a patient from Trinidad whose experience offers a glimpse into how ORNOA helps international patients:

In November, a 41-year-old steelworker from Trinidad & Tobago in the West Indies connected with ORNOA for help in treating his brain tumor. Dizzy, with some loss of vision and hearing, the patient had been told by his local physician that the 4 cm tumor resting on his brain stem was inoperable and that he would continue to lose neurological function. The patient began surfing the Internet, and started reading about the CyberKnife, a radiosurgery treatment that could safely treat inoperable brain tumors like his. The search led him to ORNOA in South Florida, an independent Patient Navigation service which offers second opinions; researches best treatment options, negotiates discounted prices and handles concierge arrangements for patients.

The Port of Spain patient was treated with the CyberKnife in December for his brain tumor, after having his case reviewed and evaluated by five physicians including neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, an oncologist and an audiologist in South Florida. ORNOA negotiated a good global price for his procedure, offering the international insurance company considerable savings and lowering the out-of-pocket fee for the patient. His tumor is expected to stop growing, and eventually shrink in size, therefore alleviating his neurological problems.

ORNOA offices are located in Dania Beach, Florida, next to the Ft. Lauderdale/Hollywood International airport. For more information, call 305-763-7997 or visit www.ornoa.com.



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KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  Florida

INDUSTRY KEYWORDS:   Health  Hospitals  Oncology  Other Health  General Health

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