Mammography Guidelines Gain ASBD Support

Breast Health Medical Society Endorses Annual Screening at 40

DALLAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- The American Society of Breast Disease (ASBD) strongly supports the new screening mammography guidelines of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology that recommends annual screening of all women ages 40 – 49.

Yearly screening represents an increase from ACOG’s prior recommendation of screening only every other year. Other medical organizations such as the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the American College of Radiology (ACR), and Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) also support annual mammography of all women beginning at age 40.

Recent medical studies from Sweden and Canada have shown that screening women ages 40-49 can reduce deaths from breast cancers found in that age group by 40%-50%. Other studies from the United States have shown that annual screening can detect breast cancers earlier than less frequent screening.

Annual screening is especially important for younger women because they tend to have denser breasts and faster-growing tumors. Screening should be performed on all women since more than 80% of women with breast cancer have no known risk factor such as history of breast cancer in a mother or sister.

For more information on the issue, access www.mammographysaveslives.org.

About the American Society of Breast Disease

Formed in 1976, the ASBD is a professional medical society that advocates the multi-disciplinary team approach to breast healthcare and educates physicians who strive to optimize breast health.

For more information, call 214-368-6836 or access www.asbd.org.



CONTACT:

Dowling & Dennis Public Relations
Liz Dowling, 415-388-2794
[email protected]

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  Texas

INDUSTRY KEYWORDS:   Seniors  Women  Health  Hospitals  Oncology  Radiology  Consumer  General Health

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