Johns Hopkins to get new president; Cardiac docs allege Florida officials let hospital standards slide;

News From Around the Web

> Johns Hopkins Hospital will instate a new president over the summer, The Baltimore Sun reports. Ronald R. Peterson, who currently holds the position, will continue to serve as executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine and president of the Johns Hopkins Health System. Peterson told the newspaper that he plans to retire in a few years and wants to mentor the new president to ensure an orderly transition. Article

> A group of cardiac doctors alleges the state of Florida relaxed care standards for Tenet Healthcare after the provider donated $200,000 to Florida Republicans, according to CNN. Article

> A five-year Department of Labor investigation into conflicts of interest involving Charlotte, North Carolina's Carolinas HealthCare System has concluded, according to the Winston-Salem Journal. Although the case is closed, the newspaper reports that the department reserves the right to bring legal action against the hospital chain in the future. Article

Health Payer News

> Newly elected Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards has signed an executive order that will expand Medicaid coverage in his state under the Affordable Care Act, fulfilling a campaign promise set by the only Democratic governor in the Deep South, according to an article in the New York Times. Article

> An Affordable Care Act rule known as the "affordability firewall" penalizes families for having employer access despite the fact that their household income would make them eligible for subsidies for marketplace plans, according to a post on the Commonwealth Fund blog. Article

And Finally… CEO CPR. Article

 

 

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