Houston Women Sought for New Breast Cancer Detection Technology

HOUSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- The Rose Imaging Specialists along with Memorial Hermann Bobetta Lindig Breast Center at Memorial City Hospital in Houston are among 18 medical groups nationally conducting clinical trials of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis, announced Dr. Stephen Rose, a Houston-based breast imaging specialist.

“Like digital Mammography, Tomosynthesis is a digital X-ray application, the main difference, however, is that the tube moves around in an arc taking multiple images of each breast from various angles instead of what has until now been a single projection. This information is then sent to a computer, which creates a vivid and accurate 3D image,” said Dr. Rose.

Conventional mammography has two primary problems, said Dr. Rose, “One is cancer hidden in dense breast tissue can be hard to find, and the other is the number of call backs for benign changes requiring further testing.” Rose said those features create false positives for patients. "Tomosynthesis could change all of that," said Dr. Rose.

Rose Imaging Specialists P.A. is a highly trained group of dedicated breast radiologists who are nationally known and board certified. Patient care is their priority. All of these efforts result in better care for the patient. Rose Imaging Specialists combine sophisticated, state of the art equipment and excellent staff of breast specialists to provide an unsurpassed level of quality and reliability. For more information, please go to www.roseimagingspecialists.net.



CONTACT:

For Rose Imaging Specialists
Henry A. de La Garza, APR, (713) 622-8818
[email protected]

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  Texas

INDUSTRY KEYWORDS:   Women  Health  Clinical Trials  Hospitals  Medical Devices  Oncology  Other Health  Research  Consumer  Science

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