Hospitalist salary plateaus, say MGMA and SHM

Hospitalists' compensation is steadying, while productivity grows, according to new data released on Wednesday from the Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) and Medical Group Management Association (MGMA), reports The Hospitalist.

The national median annual salary for internal medicine hospitalists (adult patients) in fiscal year 2010 was $220,144, a modest increase of 2.4 percent from fiscal year 2009. For pediatric hospitalists, the salary was $171,617 in 2010, a 7 percent increase from the previous year. To compare, the annual salary indicated a 9 percent increase change in the SHM 2007-2008 survey.

Specialty

Median annual salary FY 2010

Median annual salary FY 2009

% change

Internal-medicine (adult) hospitalists

$220,144

$215,000

2.4% increase

Pediatric hospitalists

$171,617

$160,038

7% increase

"What I get out of this is both compensation and productivity appear to be leveling off somewhat," said Leslie Flores, MHA, SHM, senior advisor for practice management and consultant at Nelson Flores Consultants. "We're not seeing the big increases from year to year we have seen historically."

SHM warns readers to take the survey with a grain of salt and not to jump to too many conclusions. Unlike the previous survey, this survey did not include data from academic hospitalists and therefore included a different population set.

As with all national benchmarking reports, the SHM-MGMA report might be one source out of many in determining physician compensation at individual institutions.

"Even the regional numbers don't reflect what the individual numbers are in individual markets. You need to know what the hospitalist down the street is making," Flores said.

The full SHM-MGMA report is expected to publish in September.

To learn more:
- read The Hospitalist article
- here's the MGMA survey website

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