Hospital leaders encourage execs to pursue spiritual wellbeing

Healthcare leaders across the religious spectrum may want to consider their spiritual wellbeing to help deal with the stresses of the job and prevent burnout, according to an article in Becker's Hospital Review.

Sister Carol Keehan, president and CEO of the Catholic Health Association, told the publication that she encourages leaders to look inward and reflect upon their values and priorities. No matter their faith, she said, it's important that healthcare executives have an idea of "what's worth living and what's worth dying for."

Taking time during the day for prayer or meditation can reduce stress, and once these habits are ingrained, you "can feel the difference" if you skip them, Ed Fry, president of executive search firm FaithSearch Partners, told the publication.

Fry encouraged executives to consider sabbaticals as well, as the time away, whether it's for religious or secular reasons, may also help prevent burnout and provide more "clarity" at work.

Hospital execs who engage in spiritual health may also be better role models for employees who are also under near-constant stress, Keehan said. "People want to see leaders who are comfortable in their own skin, who have a sense of mission and values in life and who, quite frankly, have a sense of joy and a sense of humor," Keehan said.

To learn more:
- read the Becker's article

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