Healthcare jobs continue to climb

Healthcare gained 49,000 jobs in February, according to the latest numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Within the industry, hospital employment increased by 15,400 jobs, according to data released today. Ambulatory care services added 28,200 positions, including 9,500 in physician offices, 4,300 in outpatient care centers and 5,000 in home healthcare services. Nursing and residential care facilities saw a gain of 5,400 jobs last month.

That totals to 360,000 jobs over the past 12 months in healthcare employment.

Overall, employment rose by 227,000 across industries last month, while the unemployment rate remained unchanged at 8.3 percent.

BLS has predicted healthcare jobs will grow the fastest out of all industry sectors over the next decade. Healthcare support occupations will grow 34.5 percent, personal care and services occupations will increase 26.8 percent, and healthcare practitioners and technical occupations will rise 25.9 percent.

"With an aging population, continued increases in chronic disease driven by obesity and lifestyle, and the coming coverage expansion, we're going to need more of all types of health care workers," Chas Roades, chief research officer with The Advisory Board Company, said in The Hill's Healthwatch. "Wages are likely to rise in the sector as well, because the same aging trend will drive a growing shortage of clinical talent."

For more information:
- read the BLS press release
- check out the data
- read the Hill's Healthwatch blog post

Related Articles:
Healthcare jobs will grow the fastest of all industries
Nurse, healthcare jobs on the rise
AHA: Medicare cuts to cost 278K hospital jobs
Healthcare jobs rise while other industries sink

Suggested Articles

The profit margins and management of Community Health Group raise questions about oversight of managed care insurers.

Financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting medical credit cards to their patients.

A proposed rule issued by HHS on Tuesday would expand short-term coverage, a move Seema Verma said will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums.