Healthcare bill showdown: Trump orders House to vote or keep Affordable Care Act intact

President Trump's first address to Congress emphasized infrastructure growth and national security, but what does that mean for hotels?
The House of Representatives is gearing up for a final vote on the full bill late Friday afternoon.

The fate of the Affordable Care Act hangs in the balance today as the House continues to debate the pros and cons of the GOP replacement plan.

UPDATE: Facing defeat, GOP pulls healthcare bill

The House of Representatives failed to vote on the American Health Care Act on Thursday, leading President Donald Trump to issue an ultimatum: Vote Friday to pass the bill, or keep President Barack Obama’s signature legislation intact.

READ THE FULL STORY HERE: Trump sets up high-stakes healthcare gamble in House

The uncertainty over the fate of the ACA and the GOP’s proposed replacement plan have caused hospitals to postpone construction and staff hires. Industry experts also worry the proposal will limit women’s healthcare, particularly coverage for preventive care, contraception and pregnancy-related care.

The American Hospital Association, which is critical of the plan to restructure Medicaid and other federal funding cuts, earlier this week launched an ad campaign against the bill. Physicians also oppose the plan and say they are worried critical patient protections and disease prevention efforts are at risk. They cited a report by the Congressional Budget Office that an estimated 24 million people could lose their health insurance by 2026 if the AHCA becomes law.

At around 10:30 this morning, the House began to vote on the “manager’s amendments” introduced earlier this week amending the AHCA, as well as last-minute additions agreed upon Thursday night. A final vote on the full bill is expected today around 4:00-5:00 p.m. EST.

Stay tuned to FierceHealthcare for ongoing coverage.

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