Doctor bias may affect transplant process

Bias by physicians could potentially be keeping Hispanic and African-American patients from receiving organ transplants, according to a newly-published study.

To examine the issue of who gets transplants, Dr. Keith Melancon of Georgetown University Hospital looked at the list of patients ready for the procedure.

The study, which can be found in the American Journal of Transplantation, found that African-Americans were 27 percent less likely than Caucasians to be recommended for a kidney-pancreas transplant, and Hispanics 25 percent less likely. This was true despite the fact that Medicare had increased coverage for people needing the simultaneous transplant of both organs.

Dr. Melancon suggests that physicians might be incorrectly assuming African-Americans have type 2 diabetes, when many met the criteria for Type 1.

To learn more about this trend:
- read this UPI piece

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