Court throws out lawsuit by union aimed to force Catholic hospital system to provide abortions; Renewal room may help prevent nurse burnout;

News From Around the Web

> Patients with severe cases of kidney stones are 26 percent less likely to receive timely treatment when they're admitted to the hospital on the weekend, according to a new report published in the Journal of Urology. Study abstract

> A federal court has thrown out a lawsuit from the American Civil Liberties Union that aimed to force Trinity Health Corporation, a Catholic hospital system that operates 86 facilities in 21 states, to provide abortions, The Washington Times reports. Article

> To help prevent nurse burnout, Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center in suburban Chicago has set up a renewal room where oncology nurses can collect their thoughts during difficult situations. The room has a massage chair, yoga mat, CDs and other relaxation methods, according to Advance Healthcare Network. Article

Health Finance News

> Big healthcare mergers, like the proposed deal between Advocate Health Care and NorthShore University HealthSystem in Chicago, face intense federal scrutiny. But regulators often ignore smaller deals involving hospitals and physician groups that over time create entities that dominate local or regional markets, The New York Times reports. Article

> As healthcare transitions from its traditional fee-for-service model to a value-based system, non-profit hospital trustees must overcome their aversion to the short-term high cost and risk of focusing on population health management, argues a commentary published in JAMA. Article

And Finally... Staying power. Article

Suggested Articles

The profit margins and management of Community Health Group raise questions about oversight of managed care insurers.

Financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting medical credit cards to their patients.

A proposed rule issued by HHS on Tuesday would expand short-term coverage, a move Seema Verma said will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums.