Countertop Appliance Splits Tap Water for Five Uses to Enhance Health, Environment

SAN DIEGO, June 5 /PRNewswire/ -- A water ionization and filtration system designed for home and office use provides unlimited quantities of healthy, eco-friendly bottle free waters for drinking, cooking, beauty (skin/hair), cleaning and sanitizing at pennies per gallon.

(Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20080605/NYFNSA04 )

Called "The Life Science Water Apparatus," the device makes five different waters at the touch of a button, ionizing them through electrolysis. The most popular personal and commercial models are available at http://www.optimumhealthwater.net .

"Unlike other filtration systems, ionization creates natural, mineral-rich, alkaline, anti-oxidant and micro-clustered drinking water, often referred to as 'miracle water' in Japan," according to Denis Alexander, distributor.

These appliances have been sold in Asia since 1974 by Enagic(TM) of Japan, where they are licensed and approved as medical devices by the government. Used in hospitals and clinics, Enagic(TM) systems are the only ones in the industry to have been endorsed by the prestigious Japanese Association of Preventative Medicine for Adult Disease.

Called Kangen Water(TM), this alkaline anti-oxidant water takes its name from the Japanese word kangen, which translates to "return to original," implying its rejuvenating effect on the body.

The Enagic Water(TM) Ionizers create multiple types of restructured tap water with health and environmental benefits including:

By eliminating plastic water bottles and most toxic chemical household cleaners and their plastic containers, this technology makes an extremely valuable environmental contribution, saves money and creates the world's healthiest waters.

SOURCE Optimum Health Water

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