Clinic nurses are more successful, cost-efficient; Former nurses accuse hospital of lying officials;

> Hospitals continue to promote the benefits of robotic surgery, as many use da Vinci robotic devices for prostate removals, heart valve repairs, hysterectomies, and throat cancer surgeries, among others, reports the Washington Post. Article

> Having nurses treat HIV patients in a primary health clinic is associated with better outcomes and reduced costs, compared to doctors treating patients at a hospital, according to a study published in this week's PLoS Medicine. According to researchers, this could help hospitals conserve resources without compromising patient outcomes. Press Release

> The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) filed a disability complaint against Johns Hopkins Home Care Group, claiming it failed to accommodate a former employee's disability. EEOC Announcement

> St. Joseph Medical Center cut costs by improving care by revamping its discharge process through the AHRQ Re-Engineered Discharge (RED) Program. The three key elements of the program include the discharge advocate, the after-hospital care plan, and a follow-up phone call from the clinical pharmacist to the patient to review medications. Blog Post

> Former Washington Hospital nurses have accused the hospital of lying to the state about a 2010 stillborn birth, reports the Oakland Tribune. Diane Strey and Christine Silcocks say the hospital placed them and two other nurses in a remedial class to prove to state health officials it was addressing the incident, although top managers told them it was because of unrelated complaints from hospital staff. Article

And Finally... A crime-fighting Chihuahua. Article

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