Cardiologists debate limiting 'overuse' of services; Hospital adds more expensive registered nurses;

> Hospitals are joining forces in Michigan, as Lansing's Sparrow Health System is partnering with Charlotte's Hayes Green Beach Memorial Hospital, reported the Lansing State Journal. Under their nonexclusive affiliation agreement, the hospitals jointly will develop operational, clinical and programmatic services. Article

> Cardiologists are debating whether to limit the "overuse" of services, reported The Washington Post. When faced with offering patients expensive angioplasities, many heart doctors said an error of commission is better than an error of omission. Article

> Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia is replacing less expensive workers with people who are paid more--registered nurses--in the interest of improved care, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. The hospital plans to add 50 to 60 RNs, which earn between $35 and $50 an hour. Article

> Long-term care patients need a stronger advocate, according to an article in California Healthline. "I would like to see a voice on the state level speaking up for residents, and we don't have that right now," said Sylvia Taylor-Stein, who runs a local ombudsman program in Ventura County, Calif. Article

> Fisher & Phillips LLP has outlined the most common Occupational Safety and Health Administration citations at hospitals during the last half of 2011, which included failure to train under the Blood Borne Pathogens (BBP) standard. Hospitals also failed to implement and maintain an exposure control plan and had poor housekeeping under the BBP standard. Article

And Finally... The science behind broken heart syndrome. Press release

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