California hospital notifies patients of missing x-rays; Are iPads overhyped for doctors?;

News From Around the Web

> Congressional Republicans claim U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebeulis' health reform fundraising efforts could violate the law, reports Reuters. Article

> DaVita has donated more than $1.75 million to charities in more than 1,000 communities across the country, the dialysis chain recently announced. Announcement

> El Centro Regional Medical Center this week notified patients that x-rays provided to a trusted vendor went missing from a storage warehouse and may not have been properly destroyed. The missing documents include patients' x-rays, paper jackets containing the films, and occasionally written interpretations; however, the California hospital has no information that these documents were improperly viewed or accessed. Notice

> Between 48.6 percent to 58.4 percent of residents from more than half of the residency programs in New York City have knowingly entered the incorrect cause of death on death certificates, according to a study published in the May 9 issue of Preventing Chronic Disease. Abstract

Health IT News

> The use of Apple iPads for certain tasks in an internal medicine residency program fell short of initial high expectations, although users reported overall satisfaction with the tools, according to study results published in an article in the Journal of Medical Internet Research. Article

> The Army's wide use of telemedicine is evolving from fixed-based access sites to highly mobile programs using cell phones, according to a report in Telemedicine and e-Health. Article

And Finally… Lesson learned for sandwich makers--go easy on the pickles. Article

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