AMA fights to keep malpractice caps in place

The AMA has released an analysis of independent research which concludes that caps on non-economic damages in med mal cases lower insurance premiums by an average of 17 percent. It also argues that in states where malpractice reforms aren't in place, physicians often end up limiting the care they provide due to liability concerns. According to the group's analysis, if the states which don't currently place a $250,000 cap on non-economic damages were to establish one, it could save $1.4 billion in premiums. 

At the same time, the report suggests, such caps can do much to attract physicians, especially specialists in high-risk categories. It projects that the number of physicians in high-risk specialties like OB/GYN is 4 percent to 7 percent higher in states which have such caps in place. Where caps aren't in place, meanwhile, premiums are shooting up, the AMA contends. The report cites the example of OB/GYNs in New Jersey, who pay $171,000 per year in annual med mal premiums, more than double what it cost them in the year 2000.

To learn more about the report:
- read this Healthcare Finance News article

Related Articles:
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IL judge throws out state's malpractice caps. Report
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Illinois med mal law faces challenge. Report
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NC will limit some medical malpractice awards. Report

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