14 hospitals reduce energy consumption by 10% or more; Most docs lack time, knowledge to plan for financial future;

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> Fourteen hospitals have been recognized for reducing their energy consumption by 10 percent or more over a 12-month period as part of the Energy Efficiency Commitment (E2C) program, the American Hospital Association's American Society for Healthcare Engineering announced Monday. For example, Good Samaritan Hospital in Cincinnati reduced its energy use by 30 percent. Announcement

> The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has sued Baptist Health South Florida, claiming the system violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by denying the reasonable scheduling request of a recently hired physician with epilepsy, the Sun Sentinel reported. Article

> While academic medical centers devote substantial time and money to leadership training programs, the scarcity of women in leadership positions suggests such programs don't work, according to a new study published online in the journal Academic Medicine. Announcement

Health Provider News

> Audiotaped encounters between 39 primary care doctors and 208 of their patients revealed a major difference in the amount of empathy physicians provided for overweight and obese patients compared with their normal-weight counterparts, researchers wrote in the current issue of the journal Obesity. Article

> With little time to spend reviewing their personal finances, nearly half of physicians consider themselves behind in planning their financial futures, according to an annual report by AMA Insurance Agency. Article

And Finally… Who needs the real Grand Canyon when you have a bathroom? Article

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