What's your 'rebuild' strategy?


So, we're at the beginning of what might actually shape up to be a good year, or at least a far less painful one than the last two. It may actually be time to rebuild some or all of what was lost between mid-2008 and the end of 2009, God willing.

Rather than pontificate about what other folks are doing, or what I've seen happen in the past, I'd like to throw this column open to you. Here's a list of questions I have about how things are going for your institution and how you expect to respond.

Please feel free to answer any or all, as no one of them is necessary by any means. Just jump in anywhere you'd like with the following:

* Is your institution planning to increase, lower or keep staffing levels even for first half of 2010?

* Do you expect to be able to borrow enough to make major capital improvements? If so, what improvements do you have in mind?

* Are your levels of uninsured patients staying the same, rising or going down at present?

* Do you expect to do badly, well or about the same if reforms pass as currently outlined?

* What do you think your biggest challenges will be for the next couple of quarters?

* Do you expect to do major partnership deals this year, and if so, to what end?

* Any other comments you'd like to make on how 2010 is shaping up for you?

Yes, there's lots of other issues to address, so if I've left something important out please do jump in and share your thoughts.

Thanks in advance for any comments you have, readers. If enough of you respond I'll share your colleagues' insights (anonymous is fine, by the way) in a coming issue of FierceHealthFinance.

Looking forward to an exciting and productive 2010! - Anne

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