NYC hospitals in construction boom; AZ budget cuts include Medicaid rate reduction;

News From Around The Web

> New York City-area hospitals will spend hundreds of millions of dollars on new construction and infrastructure improvement with the notion that patients demand more localized healthcare services, Crain's New York Business reported. Article

> Deep cuts in Arizona's budget includes a reduction in Medicaid provider rates of about 5 percent, the Arizona Republic reported. Article

> In order to protect its fiscal future, Ohio's Samaritan Regional Health System will merge with the Cleveland-based University Hospital system as early as this fall, the Mansfield News-Journal reported. Article

Provider News

> Turnover among healthcare CEOs fell in 2014 but remains high, according to research from the American College of Healthcare Executives. Last year turnover fell to 18 percent, according to the research. While this figure is a decline from 2013's record high of 20 percent, it is still one of the highest rates in 15 years, and represents an increase from both 2012's 17 percent, and 2010 and 2011's 16 percent. Article

Healthcare IT News

> The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has improved Healthcare.gov since its disastrous launch in 2013, but still lacks the IT management policies to fully fix the system, according to a new report from the Government Accountability Office. The report dings CMS for failing to follow best practices for IT management with the project, leading to problems with inadequate capacity, coding errors and limited functionality. Essentially, it said the agency was too hands-off with its contractors. Article

And finally...Ben & Jerry's marijuana ice cream? Article

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