Medicaid patients receive less preventative care; State caps on drug co-pays cause premiums to rise;

News From Around the Web

> Patients enrolled in Medicaid receive fewer preventative care services than commercial plan enrollees, concludes a new study by researchers from the Urban Institute. The study partly attributes the difference to payment rates, Kaiser Health News has reported. Article

> States are moving to cap the amount patients pay for pricey specialty drugs, but at the cost of higher insurance premiums for everyone else, StateLine has reported. Article

> A new study by Northwestern Medicine has concluded that the number of pediatric patients treated at Illinois hospitals for severe food allergies has tripled over the last five years, the Evansville Courier & Press has reported. Article

Provider News

> The healthcare field has made great strides in preventing adverse events that physically harm patients, but hospital quality improvement programs must also work to prevent emotional harm that damages a patient's dignity, according to an announcement from Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC). Just as it works to identify and systemically address physical harms to ensure they don't continue, BIDMC has set up a similar process to eliminate emotional harm, which patients emphasize even more when asked about consequences of adverse events. Article

Healthcare IT News

> Technology is meant to make work at hospitals easier and improve patient care, but often installing new systems can go awry and many health administrators lack experience with the new tools, according to Leah Binder, president and CEO of the nonprofit Leapfrog Group. Article

And Finally... Pope's portrait made from condoms. Article

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