Judge rules Arizona hospital tax is legal; Katrina refocused New Orleans' care delivery; North Shore-LIJ posts ratings of its own doctors

News From Around The Web

> A state judge has ruled that the Arizona Legislature's vote for a hospital tax to expand the Medicaid program is legal, which will likely lead to an appeal to the state Supreme Court, the Arizona Republic reported. Article

> Although Hurricane Katrina shut down New Orleans' Charity Hospital, it also helped remake the city's care delivery system, with primary care becoming a greater focus, NPR has reported. Article

> North Shore-LIJ Health System has posted on its website quality ratings of its own medical staff, in an attempt to increase transparency for patients, the Wall Street Journal reported. Article

Provider News

> The push for patient-centered care and improving population health has led to increased collaboration among hospitals, according to a nationwide survey from the American Hospital Association (AHA). About nine in 10 hospitals collaborate with other hospitals and seven in 10 participate in a regional collaborative on these initiatives, according to the survey of more than 1,400 hospitals conducted by the AHA's Research & Educational Trust and the Association for Community Health Improvement, in partnership with the Public Health Institute. Article

Healthcare IT News

> Telemedicine got its first shout out from a presidential candidate Wednesday when Hillary Clinton spoke about the tech during a speech in Iowa. The former Secretary of State said that telemedicine can help ease worries in the state over increasing closures of rural hospitals, according to Politico. "[W]e should streamline licensing and explore how to make that reimbursable under Medicare," she said. Article

And Finally... Can't take that bottle of cognac on your flight? Chug it at the terminal. Article

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