Automation pays off for many small physician offices

Automating medical practice seem to pay off, even if physicians automate just part of their practices, according to researchers and medical practices. E-prescribing and billing technologies, in particular, seem to offer a payoff rather quickly, physicians say.

For example, some practitioners are finding that e-prescribing is very helpful, even if they don't make use of an electronic medical record as of yet. One physician, family practitioner Kurt Kastendieck, MD, of Santa Fe, NM, has found that e-prescribing saves "an amazing amount of time." Using this too, Dr. Kastendieck finds that he gets paid by insurers in two weeks from a patient's visits.

Another form of automation offering high payback is electronic billing technology, doctors say. Theresa Dickson, who manages her spouse's solo general surgery practice in Dennison, TX, has found that she can get payment turned around in 20 to 30 days.

EMRs, on the other hand, still seem to cost more than they save in many cases, physicians suggest.

To learn more about this trend:
- read this Healthcare Finance News piece

Related Article:
Trend: E-prescribing on the rise despite problems

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