Training to work with EMRs; Is Kansas FP first to be federally certified?;

> Many higher education institutions, such as Rasmussen College in Minnetonka, Minn., are including in their curriculum ways to train students to work with electronic medical records (EMRs), reports the Green Bay Press Gazette. Article

> Jen Brull, MD, a family physician practicing in the tiny western Kansas town of Plainville, became what is thought to be the first physician in Kansas--if not in the country--to be federally certified for using electronic health records (EHRs). Brull, president of the Kansas Academy of Family Physicians, was certified at 9 a.m. on April 18--the first day anyone could attest to achieving Meaningful Use with EHRs. Article

> The testing of EMRs was a leading topic at the 11th annual IHE (Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise) European Connectathon that took place last month in Pisa, Italy. Article

> HealtheConnections, a regional health information organization in New York state, announced that four Syracuse-area hospitals and a laboratory have joined its health information exchange to share EHR data, the Syracuse Post-Standard reports. Article

> A Massachusetts family physician told his patients he would cease practicing medicine because he couldn't work with his three-physician group's EHR system. He said his struggle had led to one- to two-hour waits for patients. Article

> The Health Resources and Services Administration Office of Rural Health Policy is taking applications for the Rural Health Information Technology Network Development grant program. The primary purpose of the program is to support rural organizations in their ability to achieve meaningful use requirements. Article

And Finally... Cellphone "pocket dial" to 911 captures burglars. Article

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