Some health organizations still rely heavily on paper records; Do EMRs fail to capture some vital patient information?;

> Many healthcare organizations continue to rely on paper records, even in the midst of the massive nationwide push for electronic health record implementation, according to a new survey released this week by digital pen and paper vendor the Anoto Group. Announcement

> While health technology alone won't reduce healthcare costs, it will serve as a major factor in doing so, Justin Barnes, vice president of government affairs at  electronic health record vendor Greenway Medical Technologies, said according to Government Health IT. Barnes was responding to the ongoing debate between National Coordinator for Health IT Farzad Mostashari and researchers who published a study in Health Affairs concluding that use of technology actually led to increased costs. Article

> A HealthLeaders Media article this week wonders whether electronic medical records sometimes miss capturing important patient information since, as author Scott Mace writes, "in classroom terms, today's EMR is often multiple-choice, not essay." Mace talks to Philip Resnik, a professor of linguistics at the University of Maryland, who says that EMRs introduce "gaps in the narrative." Article

And Finally... I don't think I'd feel comfortable flying if I knew my fate relied on Wii remotes. Article

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