Qualcomm collaborative could help spark EHR use

Lack of patient interest in managing their own care and in electronic health records have long been problematic. But a new project may help to spark patient engagement and improve health.

A new wireless health collaborative announced last week between Hello Health and Qualcomm Life aims to integrate biometric data from wireless sensors onto a platform, which then can be then be transferred to a patient's EHR. As noted in our sister publication FierceMobileHealthcare, the project seems like the next generation in patient monitoring, since the inputted patient data can continue to be accessed by the patient and provider via the internet, rather than being parked in a dead-end, proprietary system.

"Wireless sensors that capture patient data are a wellspring of valuable patient data that belong in the patient's health record to be incorporated in patient health management," Steven Ferguson, patient management officer at Myca Health--which runs Hello Health--said in a statement.

Patients will be able to collect, add and monitor data in their EHRs, such as their physical activity, weight, sleep, medications, vital signs and other biometric data from designated connected wireless devices.  They'll also have the ability to set personal health challenges, and share their progress and achievements.

Although the announcement doesn't address whether this kind of monitoring system will directly improve patient health, arguably it may make patients more accountable and compliant, since once the data is in the EHR system, the record acts as somewhat of a silent tattletale, enabling the provider to easily ascertain if the patient is still supersizing those fries or skipping the gym.   

To learn more:
- read the Hello Health announcement
- check out the EHRWatch post

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