Providers not yet ready to meet Stage 2 challenges

Prediction: providers are going to have trouble meeting the Stage 2 Meaningful Use requirements--even though we're not sure yet what those requirements are.

That's the upshot from a recent study released by Computer Services Corporation (CSC), which analyzed the attestations filed to meet Stage 1 Meaningful Use requirements and surveyed CIOs as to what requirements they opted to attest to and why.

Certain measurements in Stage 1 are optional and could be deferred or claimed as exempt. The study revealed that some measurements in particular were being avoided by attesting providers, mainly in the areas of patient engagement and care coordination. Some of the biggest measurement pariahs included transmitting summary records at the transition of care, providing patients with electronic copies of information or discharge instructions, reconciling medications and submitting lab results for public health purposes.

The researchers theorized that if the early attesters were avoiding certain measurements, those measurements will pose an even greater challenge for later adopters of EHRs, especially once the measurements become required of all providers in Stage 2.

Survey respondents reported that they avoided these measurements mainly because either they or their EHR vendor had readiness or process challenges.

The researchers recommended that providers start working on these issues now to prepare for Stage 2, particularly in: 

  • Patient access
  • Electronically capturing physician notes
  • Exchange of patient information at transitions in care

To learn more:
- here's the study (.pdf) 
- check out this Health Data Management article

Related Articles:
Meaningful Use Stage 2 a high priority on HHS' regulatory agenda 
Today's health IT accomplishments are yesterday's challenges 
Meaningful use about better care, not just better technology

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